If only Terry knew the facts before spouting lies and inaccuracies! Reply

From Cowgill:

If it hasn’t already, that practice will have to stop, unless Miles wants to allow his school-board opponent, Jennifer Weigel, three hours per day under the FCC’s equal-time rule.

 

Here are the facts as AGREED TO by The Salisbury Democratic Committee (as allowed by FCC rules)…..

 

I, Marshall Miles, running as an independent petitioning candidate for the Salisbury Region One Board Of Education seat against the Democratic Candidate  do hereby agree to the following restrictions regarding on-air comments and commentary in-between September 1 2013 and November 5 2013:

1) I agree NOT to editorialize on any Region 1 issue in that time frame
2) I agree NOT to let any comments from telephone callers on-air WHDD on any Region 1 issue during this time frame.
3) I agree not to promote any appearances I might have regarding campaigning for the Region One Board seat on-air during this time frame.
4) I agree to announce any information the Salisbury Democratic Town Committee presents me regarding their candidate for Region One Board Of  Education ( meet and greets, press releases, etc.)
5) I agree that if and when any guests, or telephone callers to WHDD on the Breakfast Club start to talk about Region One issues in this time frame, I will inform them that I can not comment due to my agreement with the Salisbury Democratic Town Committee, and that I can not take their call on-air.

 

Sorry Terry, and by the way Terry….read the disclaimer on the  CPB Ombudsman site…

The views expressed in these reports are solely those of the author and are not to be regarded as those of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, its board of directors, officers, or employees.

 

Sorry Terry, John and Sue…I continue to run and I will campaign to win.forumflyer185

 

An open letter to Joel Kaplan, ombudsman at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Reply

An open letter to Joel Kaplan, ombudsman at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Mr. Kaplan. In addition to MANY inaccuracies in your report: WHDD and Tri-State Politics, you published two “outright lies”, falsehoods, whatever you want to call them.

1) This comment from Susie Clayton:
“When all this started happening and he started going on the air and being very critical of the superintendent and other people within Region One, I got concerned and questioned him on it and it didn’t stop,” she said.

That is a BOLD FACE LIE. Since Susie left WHDD, never mind the fact that she has never once asked me to stop, as a matter of fact, she has never spoken a word to me in that time, never sent me a letter or email to stop, so that should be removed from your report.

2) “Since then he’s been getting involved in local contests. And he’s even gone so far as to put himself on the slate in Salisbury to run for one of these school board positions. And as someone who has worked in radio before, I just found that a little disconcerting, particularly public radio.

The only editorials I have EVER done have been during budget time of the Region One Board of Education, that’s it. PERIOD. Two years ago I personally endorsed in both in writing and in an editorial that the FCC  verified was legal, two candidates for the Region One Board. I have never, I repeat never been involved in ANY OTHER LOCAL CONTESTS.

I guess what has me so personally upset at your “opinion”, is that you, yourself have obviously done no fact checking, no investigating, no follow-up. And then you sign your name to a report that is flawed in many ways. How many ways? Lets take a look:

1) Mr. Miles is also running for election as a representative on the Region One Board of Education in Sharon next month.
WRONG: A simple check with C.P.B. records would have shown you that WHDD is in Sharon, CT, and a simple Google search would have shown you I am running for a volunteer office in Salisbury, CT.

2) And while Mr. Miles and his WHDD co-founder, Jill Goodman, are not journalists, WHDD does employ journalists.

WRONG: A simple look at C.P.B records would have shown you that we have NO news people, no journalists that work, or employed at WHDD.

3) Whether or not Mr. Miles gets paid to run WHDD is irrelevant. Also irrelevant is a March 30, 2012 letter from the FCC that he cites which supported his right to endorse a candidate running for the Region 1 Board of Education. The letter stated that it was Mr. Miles’ right to endorse a candidate on the air as long as he specified that the endorsement was his personal opinion and not that of the stations. But that is a far cry from running for office himself.

WRONG AGAIN: If you read F.C.C regulations, like our FCC lawyer did, you will see we followed the procedure for on-air radio personalities in running for office, to the letter. It is not my running for office that is a far cry, it is your ASSUMPTION that I used the initial letter as reason to run for a volunteer office.

4) Ms. Clayton’s comment: “And as someone who has worked in radio before, I just found that a little disconcerting, particularly public radio.”
I really find that amazing as Susie ran for Selectmen while at WHDD (a public radio station) and for First Selectmen while at a commercial station (WQQQ). Both times she neither sought or got approval from her opponents. Had your office done any investigation, this fact would have been revealed.

5) You also use the following comment as a basis for your decision: “But I just think there needs to be unbiased reporting when it comes to public dollars. And I don’t see that equal time is being given. And I just think that the role of a public station is to put out the facts and let people decide and not put your own opinions out there in such a harmful way.”

WRONG: I gave your intern not only the names of two local First Selectmen that came on the air to endorse passage of this years budget, but I also sent her to the audio links as well. So this comment should not have been used in your decision as it is based on a lie that no equal time was given. If this were a court of law, your entire “opinion” would have been thrown out as “hearsay”.

And I find particularly disturbing your final comment:
” There is nothing wrong with Mr. Miles running for a seat on the regional board of education. There is also nothing wrong with his presiding over a public radio station. What is wrong is that he should not do both at the same time.”

Mr. Kaplan, in America, EVERYONE has a right to run for political office, EVERYONE. As long as rules are followed(Election and F.C.C), and the process had been transparent (as it has been in this case), the type of job, or position you hold does NOT exclude you from your fundamental rights as an American (at least not yet).

What’s wrong Mr. Kaplan is that a man in your position as CPB ombudsman,and as the Associate Dean for Professional Graduate Studies at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communication at Syracuse University should have higher standards when putting out such a report. You, your office as CPB ombudsman, your position as the Associate Dean for Professional Graduate Studies at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communication at Syracuse University have unwittingly been drawn into effecting a local election for a volunteer office in a town with information supplied by a few people who you know nothing about, with information that is inaccurate, incomplete, unsubstantiated and with prevailing issues you know nothing about. How unethical is that?

The next time Mr. Kaplan, do some good old-fashioned “feet on the ground investigative reporting”. Go out and interview sources at length. Go out and seek other people in the communities and get their input, and when leads are given, make sure your intern followed them up. Then please, as all good journalist do, check and double-check the facts to make sure they are correct. If you are going to sign your name to a report that has been put together with a few emails and a few telephone calls by an intern, filled with inaccuracies and hearsay, then realize that your report is not worth the paper it is written on.

And that Mr. Kaplan “is wrong; it is unfair; and it should stop.”

Marshall Miles

John, Terry and Susie…… 1

Its pretty sad when folks in big cities do not understand what goes on in rural America. A few people complained to The Corporation For Public Broadcasting, Office of the Ombudsman about me running for the regional board of education. ! ) John Mauer, 2) Terry Cowgill and 3) Susie Clayton (who, by the way I hired TWICE! And she was a miserable failure twice) and who by the way, ran for First Selectmen and Selectmen when she was employed by WQQQ! (She was in sales and was on-air with her voice on commercials!) . Well anyway, here is the report from the Ombudsman..I don’t agree with it, and wish he himself had come out to interview people instead of having an intern make a few telephone calls and not get the big picture.

Right now in our area Dale Jones (on-air for WZBG) is running with no complaints from the Democratic party in Sharon. And I am running in Salisbury with no complaints from the Democratic Party in Salisbury. We worked out any possible conflicts in advance. Maybe they should learn how to do this in Washington D.C. and we would not have a government in gridlock. You know what, it is really true that you are known best by the enemies you keep!

Well, here is the report…oh, and by-the-way..I am breaking NO F.C.C. rules, just using our LOCAL code of ethics instead of one from Washington D.C.

WHDD and Tri-State Politics

Joel Kaplan

October 10, 2013

Marshall Miles is the founder and president of WHDD, a public radio station in Sharon, Conn. which is considered the smallest NPR affiliated station in the country and which services the tri-state region of northwest Connecticut, eastern New York and southwest Massachusetts.

Mr. Miles is also running for election as a representative on the Region One Board of Education in Sharon next month.

That potential and real conflict of interest has a number of local citizens upset that Mr. Miles is using his influential position as president of Tri-State Communications, the parent of WHDD to further his political aspirations and denigrate his opponents.

“For six years, Marshall Miles has been president and CEO of Tri-State Public Communications, the organization that operates that station,” says a complaint filed by four Connecticut residents. “He currently is using the his own on-air commentaries and a political blog, regiononereport.com, to attack the educators in the Regional School District One in Connecticut, as well as members of the Region One Board of Education. His strident voice is one of the major factors in the five defeats of the regional school budget. His attacks are very personal and rarely related to educational issues.

“Moreover, he is currently running for election to the Region One Board of Education from the Town of Salisbury, and using his NPR connections to promote that candidacy, even on his Facebook page.”

The letter questioned whether Mr. Miles was violating the NPR Code of Ethics, which among other things, calls for impartiality in one’s personal life, which includes not running for political office.

In response, Mr. Miles says that while WHDD is an NPR affiliate, “We’re not NPR journalists. We never pretend to be NPR journalists. We don’t call ourselves news people. We don’t get paid for what we do. We do this as a public service.”

While I agree that the NPR ethics guidelines are directed towards NPR journalists, there remains a code of editorial integrity for local public media that specifically addresses some of these issues. In it there is an admonishment for all who work for public media to be sensitive to conflicts of interests between personal interests and their professional public media responsibilities.

And while Mr. Miles and his WHDD co-founder, Jill Goodman, are not journalists, WHDD does employ journalists. The code of integrity also says that those with direct responsibility for news and public affairs content should not engage in partisan political activities, should not espouse views on controversial issues of public importance and should not run for elected office.

Whether or not Mr. Miles gets paid to run WHDD is irrelevant. Also irrelevant is a March 30, 2012 letter from the FCC that he cites which supported his right to endorse a candidate running for the Region 1 Board of Education. The letter stated that it was Mr. Miles’ right to endorse a candidate on the air as long as he specified that the endorsement was his personal opinion and not that of the stations.

But that is a far cry from running for office himself. “Before I decided to run, I called our lawyer and I found out what the legalities were for me to run,” Miles said. “And my FCC attorney said, ‘Well you don’t have to offer people time but if somebody calls and asks for equal time you have to give it.’

“I’m pretty sure that person who’s running against me is not going to be able to give up three hours a day to come on the radio so there’s got to be some way we can work this out. And you know what? We worked it out. Because of the community service that we do, they’re allowing me to stay on the air as long as I don’t give any editorial opinions or endorse or not endorse anything pertaining to Region One.”

Among those who signed the complaint letter are John Mauer, who has been on both the regional board and the Kent, Conn. board; Susan Clayton, a selectman from North Canaan; and Terry Cowgill, a journalist and independent blogger from Salisbury, Conn. Ms. Clayton said he has known Mr. Miles for several years since both were involved in radio. After Mr. Miles left his private radio station he started several entities including an Internet only station called Robin Hood Radio, which eventually took over WHDD.

“When all this started happening and he started going on the air and being very critical of the superintendent and other people within Region One, I got concerned and questioned him on it and it didn’t stop,” she said.

“Since then he’s been getting involved in local contests. And he’s even gone so far as to put himself on the slate in Salisbury to run for one of these school board positions. And as someone who has worked in radio before, I just found that a little disconcerting, particularly public radio.

“I know public and private are a little different and there are different rules. But I just think there needs to be unbiased reporting when it comes to public dollars. And I don’t see that equal time is being given. And I just think that the role of a public station is to put out the facts and let people decide and not put your own opinions out there in such a harmful way.”

Mr. Miles said that airing his opinions about the regional school board has been a good thing. He said that before he got involved in publicizing the vote, only 300 or 400 people would vote. Now, 1,200 people are voting. “That’s what they’re upset about,” he said. “They’re upset more people are participating.”

In addition, Mr. Miles says he has been scrupulous in separating his political and personal activities from his radio station activity:

“My personal Facebook page, and the blog they’re talking about is a Region One report blog that has no connection with the radio station at all. I mean, those are totally separate things. Nothing from the radio station is on my personal page. When I post things on my personal page, it goes on my personal page. When things are on Region One report, it goes on Region One report. When things are posted on our Facebook page, it’s solely radio station stuff that does not have anything to do with school. You can scroll through it and you’ll see it. Occasionally, before I stop doing them because I’m running, is we put up audio on our Facebook page and so yes, some of the editorials that I did, they were on there.

“We keep things separate, but every day we’re on the air, we say people can call in. It is open to anybody. Because they choose not to trust me to call in … we never do journalism. Never have and never will. We’re not journalists. We are members of the community who have it open to anybody.”

The complaint about Mr. Miles has some similarities to the complaints registered against WAMC president Alan Chartock.

In both cases, critics are saying that the presidents of public radio stations are using those stations to further their own political agendas. In both cases, the response is that they are not journalist and they are simply expressing their own opinions.

But in both cases, the men are also in charge of the radio station. There is nothing wrong with Mr. Miles running for a seat on the regional board of education. There is also nothing wrong with his presiding over a public radio station. What is wrong is that he should not do both at the same time.

It is wrong; it is unfair; it is a conflict of interest and it should stop.

 

We press on and run till election day.

Board Of Ed Meeting Thursday (tomorrow) 6 PM 1

Attend this meeting it will be a long one but there is an executive session planned, and it’s our feeling here on Region One Report that the board will try a quick one and try to “settle” the frivolous law suit against board member Gale Toensing. Lets show up and voice our opinion. NO! There are only two meetings left for this board and then a new board will be seated, this dysfunctional board should not tie he hands of a new board with a foolish, expensive proposal that will be forced on the new board and taxpayers. And let them know that the 2007 series should also be left to set up meetings with the A.B.C and the NEW board starting in December….

An experts take on the iPad In The Classroom Blunder in L.A 1

“It doesn’t seem like there was much planning that went into this strategy,” said Renee Hobbs, director of the Harrington School of Communication and Media at the University of Rhode Island. “That’s where the debacle began.”

 

Hello, that is what we have been telling the Region 1 Board of months now! And still, the wanna be journalist John Mauer at the last meeting asked for the iPads to be put back in (without any plan!).

 

The status quo is no longer acceptable

Editorial Litchfield County Times: The rancor must stop. And to do that the district’s leaders must come to the table with defenses down and a willingness to listen to the public. The people—even malcontents—are not always wrong. 1

Lack of Comment In Region 1

Published: Monday, October 07, 2013

 
John Mauer in the Letters to the Editor section, is right that apathy reigns among voters in Region 1. Considering that the budget for Housatonic Valley Regional High School and for regional services provided to the six elementary schools in District 1 totals $14.4 million—the biggest annual expenditure for towns in the district—it is dismaying that so few people express an opinion on educational spending.Perhaps that apathy is generated because, year after year, voters are told in their local towns that nothing can be done about educational costs because they are largely determined by pre-existing contracts and obligations. It is hard to generate much enthusiasm for voting when the only things that can apparently be cut are programs and services directly benefitting the students.

Where Mr. Mauer errs in his reasoning in our estimation is his assumption that a handful of malcontents, aided by a compliant press, have generated the gridlock currently experienced in the district in passing a budget for the 2013-14 fiscal year. The proposed budget, which started below last year’s budgetary level and has remained there through various adjustments, has now failed six times, a record for rejections in District 1. Why it has failed has become increasingly evident in the months since its first defeat in May. It is one of only two vehicles—budgets and elections—the public has for expressing its displeasure.

There is disarray in the school district, disarray that first became evident in 2010 when the high school’s principal and assistant principal both resigned in the days prior to the school’s opening; disarray that was documented in the Pingpank Report commissioned by the Board of Education; continuing disarray that is evidenced in the lawsuits brought against and by the superintendent and assistant superintendent of schools. (One suit for harassment brought against superintendent Patricia Chamberlain by her former executive secretary was settled this week for $120,000, while the suit by assistant superintendent Diane Goncalves against Region 1 Board member Gale Toensing, also for harassment, still pends.)

There remains an adversarial dialogue between board members and some members of the public—indeed, there continues to be a division on the board itself as to the direction it should take on various issues. Underlying it all is a contention by some of the public that nothing has really changed in the administration of the school—that administrative intimidation and harassment of dissenting members on the faculties and school staffs in regional schools is still common.

Mr. Mauer complains that the opponents of the current administration are quoted excessively in the press and that this helps to stir the discontent and the negative budget votes. That, in itself, is not true. Critics are quoted but so are those speaking in defense of the board and administration. Board members’ rejoinders to the criticisms leveled against them are also reported. It is appropriate that the wider public, which usually does not attend board of education meetings, be given the details and flavor of the actions of its elected leaders.

But above and beyond that, it is shortsighted to say that a few malcontents should not be given a voice. It is accurate to say that the American Revolution would never have happened if it were not for a handful of agitators who kept pointing out the inequities of this nation’s relationship with Britain. And most Americans of the 1970s were unimpressed with a “third-rate burglary” at Watergate until the persistent digging of reporters and the revelations of critics peacefully brought down a corrupt administration.

This editorial is not meant to levy accusations of corruption against Region 1’s administrators or to endorse the actions of those protesting the current administration. Its purpose is to argue that the public has the right to know what criticisms are being leveled, to hear of the often-hostile interactions of board members and the public, and to see the cost, both psychological and financial, that is being incurred in the district.

Housatonic Valley Regional High School has always been a fine school, an institution the district could take pride in. The educators employed there and in the district’s elementary schools are dedicated to their tasks of preparing students for whatever career paths await them. Some of them express frustration with the continuing turmoil, wanting only to shine the spotlight on their students’ achievements.

To achieve that end, The rancor must stop.

And to do that the district’s leaders must come to the table with defenses down and a willingness to listen to the public. The people—even malcontents—are not always wrong.